Quitting Smoking – A Guide to Never Giving Up

According to the Mayo Clinic in the United States, smoking tobacco increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes by raising blood sugar levels, resulting in increased insulin levels. That can lead to insulin resistance which increases the chance of developing both Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Anyone who smokes more than 20 cigarettes a day nearly doubles their risk of developing Type 2, in comparison with non-smokers.

Non-smokers who spend time with smokers often get the same diseases that are common in smokers. A group of researchers in the Department of Epidemiologyy and Health Index, Center for Genome Science, Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong, Korea, and the Department of Preventive Medicine, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon, Korea set out to discover whether secondhand tobacco smoke in the environment could put non-smokers at a high risk for Type 2 diabetes. The results of their study will be published in the journal Annals of Epidemiology in January 2011.

Ten thousand and thirty-eight people from 40 to 69 years of age were included in the study. Among four thousand four hundred and forty-two volunteers who had never smoked and had not been diagnosed with diabetes at the beginning of the study:

485 acquired Type 2 diabetes within the next six years
those exposed to secondhand smoke at home had more than a 40 per cent higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than had those who were not exposed
the volunteers exposed to secondhand cigarette smoke for over 4 hours per day at home and in the workplace, had almost twice the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than those who were not exposed
From these results researchers concluded secondhand smoke in the environment was a significant risk factor for acquiring Type 2 diabetes.

When given the option, it’s always wise to choose¬†THC Edibles the non-smoking section of a restaurant or other public place. If secondhand smoke is a problem in the workplace, attention to ventilation or a discrete request to have it made a non-smoking environment might be helpful.

If family members smoke, sometimes they can be persuaded to smoke outside, use electronic cigarettes, or, better yet, to stop smoking altogether.

The Mayo Clinic has several suggestions for quitting:

not trying to have “just one” cigarette is recommended because satisfying a craving does not stop at just one
identifying and avoiding triggers
chewing gum can help
reminding yourself of good reasons to quit
requesting help from friends or family members
using nicotine products designed to curb cravings
any sort of physical activity can help
Unfortunately the stats show that once smokers quit, it’s likely they will resume smoking. But don’t let this throw you if you are a smoker. Try to stay away from other smokers and don’t be embarrassed if you feel you need to say “no” to the offer of a cigarette.

As a diabetic, you have unique things to consider after you quit. Actually your diabetes control will improve, your blood sugar levels will lower and you may want to change your insulin dose or diabetes pill schedule.

To discover answers to questions you may be asking yourself about Type 2 Diabetes, click on this link… Answers to Your Questions

Clicking on this link will help you to learn more about Type 2 Diabetes… Beverleigh Piepers RN… the Diabetes Detective.